Why Liposuction is Unlikely to Improve Your PCOS Health (Part 1)

consultation with a doctorLiposuction is touted as a shortcut to weight loss. But while you might might look better from shedding those extra pounds so dramatically,  the chances are the weight loss won’t improve your PCOS health.

When excess weight and obesity are constantly shown to be bad for you, it may seem strange to learn that losing some of that fat so quickly doesn’t make you healthier. To appreciate why, it’s important to understand that fat, or adipose tissue, which is mostly composed of many individual fat cells (adipocytes), is not inherently unhealthy.

On the contrary, adipose tissue is absolutely necessary to allow the body to store excess calories during times when we ingest more calories than we expend through activity and resting metabolism. By doing so, adipose tissue acts as a buffer of excess calories and thus protects other tissues of the body from accumulating fat (i.e. heart, liver, muscle). Individuals who completely lack fat tissue (a disorder known as congenital lipodystrophy) are very unhealthy and at great risk of diabetes and heart disease, despite having a lean, athletic appearance.

In other words, fat tissue is essential for health. Where many people get into trouble is when they exhaust their body’s ability to store more calories in adipose tissue – we all have a certain threshold to which our fat depots can expand. When we get to that point, our fat cells become so big that they are no longer able to buffer excess calories and thus cannot protect other tissues from fat accumulation and damage. This is when many of the classical metabolic problems of obesity become apparent like increased blood fats and blood glucose levels.

Tomorrow we’ll explain in detail why gradual weight loss via good old-fashioned diet and regular exercise improves your PCOS health rather than removing a mass of extra pounds through liposuction.


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