PCOS and Pre- and Type 2 Diabetes

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A root cause of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is obesity-linked Insulin Resistance, which can also increase the risk of developing Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. All are disorders that may result in Cardiovascular Disease leading to a heart attack or stroke.
Woman After ExercisePre-Diabetes affects people with blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet in the Type 2 Diabetes range. Doctors sometimes call this condition impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), depending on the blood test used to diagnose it.

The good news is that Pre-Diabetes doesn’t have to lead to Type 2 Diabetes because it can be reversed. But if neglected, Pre-Diabetes may become Type 2 Diabetes, which, in the vast majority of cases, must be managed for the rest of a Diabetic’s life and often requires daily injections of insulin.

Type 2 Diabetes, itself, is also a significantly increased risk factor for blindness, amputation and kidney disease. So it is critical that you understand the interaction of Insulin Resistance-linked PCOS and the various forms of Diabetes in order to avoid the onset of other serious health complications.

The human body processes food into energy by converting it into glucose, which is then passed via insulin through the cell walls. Insulin is a vital hormone produced in the pancreas. Insulin Resistance de-sensitizes the cell walls to insulin and impairs the vital conversion of glucose into energy.

Pre- and Type 2 Diabetes are signs that this conversion process is not working properly. People with one form or another of Diabetes either cannot use the insulin that is produced or they have a pancreas that produces little or no insulin. As the pancreas struggles to keep up with the body’s need for more insulin, excessive levels of glucose and insulin build up in the blood stream, often leading directly to Pre- and Type 2 Diabetes.

ChartVarious factors that figure in the onset of PCOS are also implicated in the development of Pre- and Type 2 Diabetes: excessive abdominal fat, high LDL “bad” blood cholesterol and low HDL “good” cholesterol, high levels of triglycerides and hypertension (high blood pressure).

When you are Insulin Resistant, your muscle, fat and liver cells do not use insulin properly. Because of the overproduction of insulin from the pancreas, many people with Insulin Resistance have high levels of both blood glucose and insulin circulating in their blood at the same time.

It’s important to understand the distinction between Insulin Resistance and Pre- and Type 2 Diabetes. Insulin Resistance occurs when the body produces enough insulin but its cells lack enough receptor sites to allow the absorption of insulin at a cellular level. Pre- and Type 2 Diabetes develop when the body either doesn’t produce enough insulin or it can’t process the insulin that is produced. All of the factors associated with Insulin Resistance, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and Pre-Diabetes are interrelated. Obesity and lack of exercise worsen Insulin Resistance, which then has a negative effect on blood lipid production, increasing VLDL (very low-density lipoprotein), LDL cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein – the “bad” cholesterol) and triglyceride levels in the bloodstream, as well as decreasing HDL cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein – the “good” cholesterol.)

These conditions are also majorly increased risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes which is one of the top fatal disorders in the United States. In 2000, it was the sixth leading cause of death and has been associated with long-term complications affecting almost every part of the body, including blindness, heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputations and nerve damage.

Obese women are particularly susceptible to PCOS and Pre- and Type 2 Diabetes. A vicious cycle quickly forms because these conditions, in turn, put women at dramatically increased risk of Cardiovascular Disease, as well as the development of many other serious health conditions, including stroke, kidney damage and blindness. Overweight women do not, however, have a monopoly of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and its related disorders because females of normal weight and even lean women are also prone to these conditions.

Many patients have been educated about the importance of exercising, checking their cholesterol levels and having their blood pressure monitored. But there has been little documentation to tie these factors together.

Studies show that a single solution will not work in trying to address the myriad symptoms of conditions that can lead to Insulin Resistance-linked PCOS and Pre-Diabetes. No pharmaceutical has yet been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) specifically to reverse these conditions, though there are approved drugs for use in the management of Type 2 Diabetes, which is an irreversible disorder in the vast majority of cases.

If you wish to return to optimum health and avoid or reverse Insulin Resistance, you have to consider a system that combines nutraceuticals (vitamins, minerals, amino acids, enzymes and botanicals formulated to address specific conditons), a realistic exercise program, nutritional guidance and a support system that will help you change unhealthy lifestyle choices.

Click here to read about the ground-breaking Insulite PCOS System, which is scientifically-designed to reverse Insulin Resistance, a condition that often underlies Diabetes. The system includes several formulations such as InsulX, with ingredients like magnesium, which helps maintain normal blood glucose and insulin levels – key factors in reversing insuline resistance and Pre-Diabetes.

You may be interested in some of our Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about PCOS and the Insulite PCOS System.

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Take these simple steps to take control of your PCOS


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