New Exercise Guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Diseases Control & Prevention

Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention
USA.gov

How much physical activity do adults need?

Physical activity is anything that gets your body moving. According to the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, you need to do two types of physical activity each week to improve your health–aerobic and muscle-strengthening.

For Important Health Benefits Adults need at least:

 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) each week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (i.e., brisk walking)

OR

 75 minutes (1 hour and 15 minutes) each week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity (i.e., jogging or running)

OR

An equivalent mix of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity
 
In addition, all adults should include muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest,  shoulders, and arms). 

 

Give it a try
Try going for a 10-minute brisk walk, 3 times a day, 5 days a week. This will give you a total of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity.

10 minutes at a time is fine
We know 150 minutes each week sounds like a lot of time, but you don’t have to do it all at once. Not only is it best to spread your activity out during the week, but you can break it up into smaller chunks of time during the day. As long as you’re doing your activity at a moderate or vigorous effort for at least 10 minutes at a time.

For Even Greater Health Benefits Adults should increase their activity to:

300 minutes (5 hours) a week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity

OR

150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity

OR

An equivalent mix of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activity
 
In addition, all adults should include muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days a week that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest,  shoulders, and arms). 

 
More time equals more health benefits
If you go beyond 300 minutes a week of moderate-intensity activity, or 150 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity activity, you’ll gain even more health benefits.

Aerobic activity – what counts?
Aerobic activity or “cardio” gets you breathing harder and your heart beating faster. Walking fast, running, riding a bike, playing basketball, or swimming laps are all examples.

You can do moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic activity, or a mix of the two each week. Intensity is how hard your body is working during aerobic activity. A rule of thumb is that 1 minute of vigorous-intensity activity is about the same as 2 minutes of moderate-intensity activity.

Build up over time
If you want to do more vigorous-level activities, slowly replace those that take moderate effort like brisk walking, with more vigorous activities like jogging.

Some people like to do vigorous types of activity because it gives them about the same health benefits in half the time. If you haven’t been very active lately, increase your activity level slowly. You need to feel comfortable doing moderate-intensity activities before you move on to more vigorous ones. The guidelines are about doing physical activity that is right for you.

How do you know if you’re doing light, moderate, or vigorous aerobic activity?
For most people, light daily activities such as shopping, cooking, or doing the laundry doesn’t count toward the guidelines. Why? Your body isn’t working hard enough to get your heart rate up.

Moderate-intensity aerobic activity means you’re working hard enough to raise your heart rate and break a sweat. One way to tell is that you’ll be able to talk, but not sing the words to your favorite song. Here are some examples of activities that require moderate effort:

Walking fast
Doing water aerobics
Riding a bike on level ground or with few hills
Playing doubles tennis
Pushing a lawn mower

 
Vigorous-intensity aerobic activity means you’re breathing hard and fast, and your heart rate has gone up quite a bit. If you’re working at this level, you won’t be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath. Here are some examples of activities that require vigorous effort:

Moderate and vigorous activities
For more examples, check out See General Physical Activities Defined By Level of Intensity (PDF-64k)

Jogging or running
Swimming laps
Riding a bike fast or on hills
Playing singles tennis
Playing basketball

 
Muscle-strengthening activities – what counts?
Besides aerobic activity, you need to do things to strengthen your muscles at least 2 days a week. These activities should work all the major muscle groups of your body (legs, hips, back, chest, abdomen, shoulders, and arms).

You can do activities that strengthen your muscles on the same or different days that you do aerobic activity, whatever works best. Just keep in mind that muscle-strengthening activities don’t count toward your aerobic activity total.

There are many ways you can strengthen your muscles, whether it’s at home or the gym. You may want to try the following:

Lifting weights
Working with resistance bands
Doing exercises that use your body weight for resistance (i.e., push ups, sit ups)
Heavy gardening (i.e., digging, shoveling)
Yoga

To gain health benefits, muscle-strengthening activities need to be done to the point where it’s hard for you to do another repetition without help. A repetition is one complete movement of an activity, like lifting a weight or doing a sit-up. Try to do 8—12 repetitions per activity that count as 1 set. Try to do at least 1 set of muscle-strengthening activities, but to gain even more benefits, do 2 or 3 sets.

What if you have a disability?
If you are an adult with a disability, regular physical activity can provide you with important health benefits, like a stronger heart, lungs, and muscles, improved mental health, and a better ability to do everyday tasks. It’s best to talk with your health care provider before you begin a physical activity routine. Try to get advice from a professional with experience in physical activity and disability. They can tell you more about the amounts and types of physical activity that are appropriate for you and your abilities. If you are looking for additional information, visit The National Center on Physical Activity and Disability.*

Tips on Getting Active
Adding Physical Activity to Your Life
If you’re thinking, “How can I meet the guidelines each week?” don’t worry. You’ll be surprised by the variety of activities you have to choose from.

Be Active Your Way: A Guide for Adults
Based on the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, this brochure can help you decide the number of days, types of activities, and times that fit your schedule.

http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/guidelines/adults.html


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