High Cholesterol? If You Have PCOS, the Cause May Not be Rooted in Your Diet

High cholesterol is one of those diagnoses that people get without always understanding exactly what it means. Of course, most people are aware that it can lead to heart disease due to buildup of cholesterol in the arteries, but oftentimes individuals may not consider the fact that this issue is due to an underlying health condition, not just to the greasy fast food and cholesterol-laden comfort food that so many people enjoy. In fact, for women, high cholesterol may be a sign of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS.

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome is a condition that only occurs in women and presents a variety of symptoms, including an increase in male hormone levels, weight gain or obesity, high cholesterol, anxiety, depression, male pattern baldness, excessive facial hair growth, and an increased risk for coronary heart disease. Many women that have PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) experience a unique combination of these and other symptoms, but they often share the experience of high cholesterol.

Two kinds of cholesterol have been identified and are tracked by doctors: LDL and HDL. LDL is known as the “bad” cholesterol, and high levels of it can cause heart attacks and even strokes. On the other hand, HDL is known as the “good” cholesterol and the more that a woman has the healthier she is deemed to be. Women with PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) often have high levels of LDL and low levels of HDL, making them more likely to suffer from a heart attack or stroke than women that do not have their condition. One of the leading causes of heart attacks is atherosclerosis, which is the buildup of plaque around the walls of the arteries. Women with high cholesterol are much more likely to develop atherosclerosis than those with lower levels.

Treating cholesterol is much like treating PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome)—it takes a comprehensive approach and a lifestyle change. Because PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) is often rooted in insulin resistance, the dietary habits of women looking to reverse the effects of both of these conditions are crucial. By following a well rounded diet that avoids the foods that spark insulin resistance, as well as includes those that contain the fiber, vitamins, and minerals that are necessary for a healthy body, women can greatly improve their condition.

Additionally,  PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) can be treated with the use of nutraceuticals, which are vitamins, herbs, and minerals that have been combined to specifically target the condition, an exercise program that fits individual physical limitations and capabilities, and a network of others to fall back on and ask questions when things seem overwhelming.

Treating Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, and thereby reducing the high cholesterol and other symptoms that accompany it, is a complex lifestyle change that requires dedication and effort. Unhealthy dietary habits must be broken, and an exercise routine must be established. Though this may seem tough, the changes can be integrated gradually and the rewards that result from making these changes are well worth the hard work!

Learn more here about the subject of high cholesterol and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS), and how it could be affecting your health.

Insulite Health, a Boulder, Colorado USA based company, is committed to reversing Insulin Resistance – a potentially dangerous imbalance of blood glucose and insulin. Scientific research has revealed that this disorder can be a primary cause of excess weight gain and obesity, plus Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. Insulin Resistance can also underlie the cluster of increased risk factors for cardiovascular damage called Metabolic Syndrome (Syndrome X) as well as PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) – a major source of serious diseases as well as heartbreaking female infertility.

Recognizing that there are millions of people who need this kind of systematic approach to reversing insulin resistance, Insulite Health has, developed systems to address the underlying causes of metabolic syndrome, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), excess weight/obesity, pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

For more information about Insulin Resistance and research links to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), PubMed Health, GenBank and more visit us at www.pcos.com.

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