Can PCOS Increase Your Risk for Heart Disease?

At first glance, the idea may seem impossible. Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS, is a condition that is considered to be gynecological in nature, affecting the fertility and hormones of a woman, not her cardiovascular system. However, there have been several links found between the two conditions, and researchers have discovered that women with PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) are almost two times as likely to develop atherosclerosis, or the deposit of plaque among the walls of their arteries, than women that do not have the condition.

Though this idea may seem implausible at first, keep in mind the fact that the many systems of the body are all interconnected; every system interacts with another in some way, resulting in the ability of some health issues to become widespread and affect other parts of the body. Additionally, keep in mind the fact that as a hormonal disorder, PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) reaches all parts of the body, as hormones are released on a daily basis. Not surprisingly, women with this condition are at a higher risk for many health issues, including heart disease, Diabetes, obesity, high cholesterol, and hypertension—many of which contribute to problems with the cardiovascular system.

Oftentimes, women that suffer from Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome have developed the condition due to insulin resistance. When insulin resistance occurs, glucose is not properly broken down by the body and is left to wander throughout the blood stream. The increased levels of glucose can certainly increase the risk of Type 2 Diabetes, which many women go on to develop. Once Diabetes takes root, it leads to a greater risk of heart disease. Although coronary heart disease is one of the largest threats to the health of the men and women in the United States, it is sometimes caused by other health problems and is not always a standalone occurrence, as is seen by the increased amount of women that develop heart disease and also have PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome).

But it is not just the fact that women with PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) are more prone to Diabetes that makes their risk for heart disease higher. They also suffer through other symptoms that contribute to stress on the cardiovascular system, including weight gain, high blood pressure, and even high cholesterol. Coronary heart disease is an umbrella term that encompasses a variety of heart health issues, many of which can be brought on by the changes that PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) causes in a woman’s body.

No magic treatment has been found to address either of these conditions, but a well-rounded approach is one that can increase the health of anyone that suffers from either of these health problems. By increasing the frequency and duration of exercise, eating a sensible, balanced, and nutritious diet, and ensuring that all the essential vitamins and nutrients are being integrated into their meals (either through supplements or targeted meal plans), women that are at risk for either of these conditions can improve and even reverse the affects of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

To learn more about the subject of heart disease and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS), and how it could be affecting your ability to get pregnant, visit us on the web at www.pcos.com.

Insulite Health, a Boulder, Colorado USA based company, is committed to reversing Insulin Resistance – a potentially dangerous imbalance of blood glucose and insulin. Scientific research has revealed that this disorder can be a primary cause of excess weight gain and obesity, plus Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. Insulin Resistance can also underlie the cluster of increased risk factors for cardiovascular damage called Metabolic Syndrome (Syndrome X) as well as PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) – a major source of serious diseases as well as heartbreaking female infertility.

Recognizing that there are millions of people who need this kind of systematic approach to reversing insulin resistance, Insulite Health has, developed systems to address the underlying causes of metabolic syndrome, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), excess weight/obesity, pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

For more information about Insulin Resistance and research links to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), PubMed Health, GenBank and more visit us at www.pcos.com.

Could the symptoms you are suffering with be PCOS? Click the headline below to take the PCOS Test and find out!

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