Can a Hysterectomy Reverse PCOS?

As far as surgical procedures go, a hysterectomy is among the most mundane, the most run-of-the-mill you’ll ever encounter. And that’s for good reason: Simply put, a lot of women have hysterectomies. It is, indeed, one of the most commonly occurring surgical procedures of all, with roughly one third of all women having the procedure done before they reach age 60. And they get the procedure done for any number of reasons, too—including as a response to PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome).

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is itself quite a commonplace condition; indeed, it’s the most common women’s hormonal disease there is, with roughly 5 to 10% of all women of childbearing age suffering from it. Sometimes manifesting itself as a string of cysts in the ovaries, it can cause major complications with pregnancy, including infertility and miscarriage. It also causes painful and irregular periods, in many instances, and can be linked to a variety of conditions that range from obesity to skin problems.

You can probably pick up on the train of thought here, the perceived link between PCOS and hysterectomy. You can understand how one might think that a hysterectomy—which often involves the removal of one or both ovaries—might help to reverse the effects of what is, on some level, a disease of the ovaries. But this thinking is flawed for a couple of reasons.

For one thing, a hysterectomy does not necessarily deal with the fundamental cause of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). The disorder is typically rooted in Insulin Resistance—meaning that is can have a number of effects beyond those related to pregnancy, fertility, and so forth. For instance, PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) can often cause obesity. It can often cause problems with the hair and the skin. The disorder is not rooted in the ovaries exclusively, so a hysterectomy is not necessarily going to fix all the symptoms.

More to the point, perhaps, is the fact that many women with PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) are not eligible to have a hysterectomy performed at all. Again, this is because the disorder is primarily a hormonal and metabolic one and therefore has effects that include obesity, heart disease, and may make it too risky for a surgery to be performed.

The question, then, might be this: How do you reverse the effects of PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) if not by means of a hysterectomy? The good news is that reversing the condition is very possible, particularly with the system made available by Insulite Health, the leading name in research related to this condition. Their resources include both educational articles and a supplement that can turn back the effects of the disease by balancing out the hormones. That’s a much safer and more viable way to go than by hysterectomy—and it is good reason for any PCOS sufferer to be hopeful.

Learn more about the subject of Hysterectomy and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) and how it could be affecting your health visit us on the web at https://www.pcos.com/hysterectomy-with-polycystic-ovarian-syndrome/

Insulite Health, a Boulder, Colorado USA based company, is committed to reversing Insulin Resistance – a potentially dangerous imbalance of blood glucose and insulin. Scientific research has revealed that this disorder can be a primary cause of excess weight gain and obesity, plus Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. Insulin Resistance can also underlie the cluster of increased risk factors for cardiovascular damage called Metabolic Syndrome (Syndrome X) as well as PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) – a major source of serious diseases as well as heartbreaking female infertility.

Recognizing that there are millions of people who need this kind of systematic approach to reversing insulin resistance, Insulite Health has, developed systems to address the underlying causes of metabolic syndrome, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), excess weight/obesity, pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

For more information about Insulin Resistance and research links to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), PubMed Health, GenBank and more visit us at www.pcos.com

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